Plant Siting and Permitting Social Media Toolkit

Plant Siting and Permitting Social Media Toolkit

IBWA has noticed an uptick in plant siting opposition action at the local level throughout the country. This is affecting companies big and small.

To help educate consumers on a grassroots level about bottled water industry facts, IBWA developed the following social media toolkit materials for members to use on their social channels.  IBWA members are encouraged to share the following web posters and corresponding posts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest. The posts below can be used as provided or members can use them as inspiration for developing original messages.

 

Campaign hashtags: #BottledWaterFacts #HealthyH2OCommunities

Claim: Bottled water companies deplete resources.

IBWA Pie Websmall, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

WaterUsePlant Final336, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

Industry Perspective: When a bottled water company decides to build a bottling plant, there are many things that are taken into consideration, including the availability of a long-term, sustainable source of water and the ability to protect the land and environment around the source and bottling facility. Sustainability of the source is very important to area stakeholders—and to the bottled water company—due to the long-term business investment that is required to build the plant. Once the plant is built, the company closely monitors and measures water use/withdrawals and continuously looks for ways to reduce the amount of water used in production.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • When deciding to build or expand a bottled water plant, companies consider the availability of a long-term, sustainable source of water and the ability to protect the land and environment around the source and bottling facility.
  • When a bottled water company identifies a potential source, it undertakes significant scientific exploration to ensure that the source can be used sustainably over the long term—and then the science is shared with authorities and the community.
  • To help ensure water withdrawals do not have negative environmental impacts, bottled water companies employ progressive water-management techniques, including systems that allow hydrologists and geologists to monitor springs.
  • When investigating a spring for development, bottled water companies study it to ensure the resource is sustainable over the long term.
  • Bottled water plant coming to town? Good news! That means the protection of the surrounding natural resources have long been considered, and there’s a plan in place to keep them protected for years to come.
  • Consumers love bottled water, but they are sometimes hesitant to welcome a bottled water plant into their community. Once they know the facts, however, they know there’s nothing to fear. That’s because bottled water companies conduct a lot of research to ensure both the water source and the surrounding environment are protected and sustainable for the long-term.
  • There’s a misconception that bottled water plants deplete surrounding resources. The truth? Bottled water companies incorporate environmental sustainability efforts into their strategies—before the plant is even built.
  • New or expanding bottled water plants need a long-term, sustainable water source & they work to make that happen by protecting the environment around the source.
  • DYK: Bottled water companies research long-term source viability before building a plant. Check out this image depiction.

Claim: Bottled water companies pay very little for public water system (PWS) water.

Ibwa Waterbills Websmall 0, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

Municipal Water Users FINAL336 2, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

Industry Perspective: Like all commercial water customers, bottled water companies that use municipal water sources pay for the water they use.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Like all commercial water customers, bottled water companies that use municipal water sources pay for the water they use. Of all the water used in the United States, bottled water production uses an extremely small amount of water—just 0.011%.
  • What do soft drink, beer, pharmaceutical, paint, and automobile companies have in common? They all purchase commercial water. But did you know that bottled water is actually a minimal water user?
  • Like soft drink, automobile, pharmaceutical companies and others, the #bottledwater industry pays its share for public water usage.
  • It might come as a surprise, but did you know that soft drink, beer, pharmaceutical, paint, and automobile manufacturers all use more water than bottled water companies?
  • Some bottled water bottlers get source water from public water systems (and then they use a multi-barrier approach to filter and purify the water and then package it in a sanitary environment—which is why you can never say “bottled water is just tap water in a bottle.”) But were you aware that bottled water companies use less water than soft drink, beer, pharmaceutical, paint, and automobile manufacturers?
  • All commercial industries pay for the water they use, but did you know bottled water isn’t the biggest user?

Claim: Bottled water companies take water during droughts and other periods of water shortages.

Industry Perspective: Like all commercial and residential water users, bottled water companies follow all government mandates to decrease water use when conditions require it. In addition, as good environmental stewards, many bottled water companies voluntarily cutback on their water use during droughts and other water shortages.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Like all commercial and residential water users, bottled water companies follow all government mandates to decrease water use when conditions require it.
  • Ever been asked to cut back on water during a drought? Your local bottled water companies have been right there with you. Bottled water companies follow all government mandates to decrease water use when required.
  • As good environmental stewards, many bottled water companies voluntarily cutback on their water use during droughts and other water shortages.
  • Have to cut back on water during a drought? You’re not alone. Bottled water companies also cut back water usage during shortages.
  • DYK: Bottled water companies often voluntarily cutback on their water use during droughts and other water shortages.

 

Claim: Bottled water companies ship water great distances.

Where%20bottled%20water%20comes%20fromAUG15 4, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled WaterIndustry Perspective: Most bottled water is produced and consumed locally. Water is heavy; therefore, trucking and shipping water great distances is expensive and time consuming.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Trucking and shipping water long distances is time consuming and very expensive—and isn’t part of most bottled water companies’ business models.
  • Think bottled water travels a long way? Take a closer look at your bottled water label. If any locations look familiar, it’s because most bottled water is produced locally and/or regionally.
  • DYK most bottled water is produced and consumed locally? Don’t believe it? Check the label to find out where you bottled water is bottled.
  • Most #BottledWater doesn’t travel far once it’s produced—that’s because most bottled water is made locally or regionally. Take a closer look at the label.
  • You’re never too far away from bottled water. Most companies produce their bottled water locally or regionally.

 

 

Claim: Water permits are too long.

IBWA Longpermits Websmall 1, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled WaterBottled Water Plant FINALRev 01 320 1, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

Industry Perspective: Bottled water companies are no different from other companies that use water—however, bottled water companies are often highly scrutinized over the length of their water permits. Such undue scrutiny is a concern, especially considering that a government body issues water use permits based on sound science that shows the aquifer can sustain withdrawals at a certain rate per day/year for the length of the permit time. In addition, bottled water companies invest in communities—building facilities that will produce healthy hydration for the region and provide meaningful jobs for its citizens and tax revenue for the community for the long haul.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Bottled water companies invest in communities—building facilities that will produce healthy hydration for the region and provide meaningful employment for its citizens and tax revenue for the community for the long haul.
  • Before proposing to build a bottled water facility at a new location, bottled water companies consider what their presence adds to the fabric of the community. Success is only reached if the relationship between the bottler and the community is built on trust and cooperation.
  • DYK #bottledwater companies must produce scientific proof that an aquifer can sustain withdrawals for the length of the requested timeframe before a government body gives them a water use permit?
  • Longevity for #bottledwater companies in your community can result in longevity of jobs and #healthyhydration.
  • DYK scientific proof of sustainability is required before a government body gives a bottler a water use permit?

 

Claim: Bottled water uses large quantities of water.

USwaterusedropletbwposter Nov1 Websmall, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

Industry Perspective: Of all the water used in the United States, bottled water production uses an extremely small amount of water, just 0.011% of the total.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Of all the water used in the United States, bottled water production uses an extremely small amount of water, just 0.011%  of the total.
  • Where does bottled water production rank in terms of water usage in the United States? The answer might surprise you.
  • DYK bottled water uses an extremely small amount of water compared to other industries? It’s true: just 0.011% of the total.
  • If you think bottled water production uses a lot of water, think again.
  • Think it takes a lot of water to make bottled water? Think again.
  • Bottled water production uses a really small amount of water. No, really. Take a closer look.

 

Claim: Bottled water is unnecessary because it’s just the same as tap water.

IBWA Process Websmall, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water Flowchart Final 336, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled Water

Industry Perspective: Purified bottled water made from a public water source is not just tap water in a bottle. Bottled water companies use state-approved municipal water systems and purify it to meet stringent industry and government standards.

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Purified bottled water made from a public water source is not “just tap water in a bottle.” Bottled water companies use state-approved public water systems and purify the water to meet stringent industry and government standards.
  • It’s quite a journey before public source water can be labeled purified bottled water. Learn about all the steps involved.
  • If you think #BottledWater is just “tap water in a bottle,” then you don’t understand how purified bottled water is produced. Check out this illustration to review the many steps taken to ensure your purified bottled water meets government standards.
  • It takes a lot to become purified bottled water. Here’s a summary of the steps necessary.
  • #BottledWater is just “tap water in a bottle”? Think again. This graphic shows the many steps taken to produce purified bottled water.

 

Claim: Plastic bottled water containers are bad for the environment.

Packaging%20infograph%20for%20online%20SM 5, Bottled Water | IBWA | Bottled WaterIndustry Perspective: Bottled water has the smallest environmental footprint of all packaged beverages. All bottled water containers are 100 percent recyclable, and, as an industry, we support strong community recycling initiatives and recognize that a continued focus on increased recycling is important for everyone. In addition, bottled water containers are the most common item in curbside recycling programs, recycled at a rate of 53.1 percent. And the industry is always looking for ways to strengthen existing recycling programs and help to expand recycling efforts ever further. However, even when they are not properly recycled, bottled water containers make up only 3.3 percent of all drink packaging in U.S. landfills. Soda PET plastic containers make up 13.3 percent. Bottled water also has the lowest water- and energy-use ratios of all packaged beverages. On average, it takes only 1.32 liters of water to produce 1 liter of finished bottled water (including the liter of water consumed), which is the lowest water-use ratio of any packaged beverage product. And on average, only 0.24 mega joules of energy are used to produce 1 liter of bottle of water. Continual light-weighting of PET bottled water plastic packaging has seen the average weight drop to 9.25 grams per 16.9 ounce single-serve container. That is almost one-third less than the amount of PET it takes to make soda and other drink containers, which need to be thicker due to carbonation and manufacturing processes and weigh, on average, 23.9 grams. According to the Beverage Marketing Corporation, between 2000 and 2014, the average weight of a 16.9 ounce (half-liter) PET plastic bottled water container declined 51 percent. This resulted in a savings of 6.2 billion pounds of PET resin since 2000.

 

 

Suggested Social Media Posts:

  • Bottled water has the smallest environmental footprint of all packaged beverages.
  • Bottled water PET plastic containers make up only 3.3% of the drink packing found in U.S. landfills, compared to soda PET plastic containers at 13.3%. But with a recycled rate of 53.1%, bottled water containers are the most common item in curbside recycling programs.
  • Bottled water has the smallest environmental footprint of all packaged beverages.
  • Bottled water containers make up just 3.3% of all drink packaging found in U.S. landfills, which pales in comparison to soda, glass, and aluminum cans.
  • Bottled water containers often take on the brunt of the blame for America’s litter issues, but should it?

 

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